The Anti-racist Cheat Sheet

These resources have been curated by people other than myself. I am centralizing them so white people can access them without the labor of education falling on black people. Please peruse, share, and enjoy, knowing that the woman who arranged this (me)is problematic, but growing and learning . That is the goal. Please feel free to send feedback and suggestions my way as well.

A more comprehensive list including twitter threads, funds to contribute to and a WEALTH of other info can be found through Black Lives Matter: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1-0KC83vYfVQ-2freQveH43PWxuab2uWDEGolzrNoIks/mobilebasic#h.28ybn38q6jee

Can’t Protest? Short on money?

  • Kamali Alcyonia Obiagu Provided these insights:
  • Text FLOYD to 55156 and demand that the officers responsible for George Floyd’s murder be held accountable.
  • Call DA Michael Freedman at (612)-324-4499 to demand that all 4 officers be charged and arrested.
  • Contact your congressional representatives, urging them to support Rep Pressley and Rep Omar’s resolution condemning police brutality.

Donate to (list taken from Kamali Alcyonia Obiagu):

Donate to bail funds (Listed by city and state across the US): https://bailfunds.github.io/

Things to not say to black people right now (First 3 from Adunola Adeshola, later items by Jagger Blaec):

  • Expecting things to be normal — nothing about right now is normal, and that is an unfair expectation to place on black people right now.
  • “I am afraid to say the wrong thing”— In the words of Adunola Adeshola in Forbes Magazine, “We do not have the personal luxury of keeping quiet in fear that we might say the wrong thing, nor do we have the mental capacity to help make sure you say the right thing.”
  • I hope things change soon“– We gotta do more than hope. We have to initiate conversations in non-black spaces where our likability is on the line. We need to actively participate in the change to manifest it.
  • “You’re so strong”
  • “Are you ok?”
  • “How are holding up?”
  • “Do you want to talk?

What to say instead (by Journalist, Jagger Blaec):

  • “Is there anything you need right now?”
  • “What can I do for you?”
  • “I am holding space if you need someone to listen.”

Petitions to Sign:

Kimberle Crenshaw

Before entering the educational portion, it is important to honor the concept of intersectionality, coined by Kimberle Williams Crenshaw. Intersectionality means that a person’s existence is not solely through the lens of one identity (IE: race), but complicated by the many identities they hold at the same time (IE: native language, socio-economic status, religion, age, dis-ability, gender, sexuality).

Literature:

Understanding white privilege:

Centralizing black narratives:

This INCREDIBLE Google Doc designed by Seji (instagram @theartisangeek) :https://docs.google.com/document/d/1ffsB6mzGdOlHztJOCyFjFLYcfpP7l6H5UrV45tz42eg/mobilebasic

Podcasts (List generated by Well + Good’s Kara Jillian Brown)

#TellBlackStories 
The 2020 Webby Award-winning podcast from the Color of Change is centered around ensuring accurate, diverse, empathetic, and human portrayals of Black people in film and television. Guests like Michael B. Jordan, Yara Shahidi, and Ava DuVernay have made appearances. You can listen to it on Apple PodcastsSpotifySound Cloud, and Stitcher.

Still Processing
Hosted by Jenna Wortham and Wesley Morris of the New York TimesStill Processing discusses current events and pop-culture moments. Wortham is a staff writer for the paper’s T Magazine and Morris is the paper’s critic-at-large. They’ve looked at everything from California’s new legislation to allow college athletes to make money off of endorsements to shows like High Fidelity and songs like Old Town Road. It’s available on Apple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsSpotify, and Stitcher.

Code Switch
On NPR’s podcast Code Switch, hosts Shereen Marisol Meraji and Gene Demby discuss how race impacts everything from politics and pop culture to history and sports. A recent episode explored how two Los Angeles-based Capoeira instructors are staying afloat after COVID-19 forced them to close their gym. You can listen to it on NPR OneApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsPocket Casts, and Spotify.

Fare of the Free Child Podcast

Parenting Forward Podcast episode, “Five Pandemic Parenting Lessons with Cindy Wang Brandt”

More Podcasts from Brea Baker of Elle Magazine: https://www.elle.com/culture/movies-tv/g32732684/anti-racism-podcasts/

Movies:

Black Joy in Media: The current times demand unrest. In acknowledging black oppression, it is also important to celebrate black joy, artistry, and reveling in life. Only when we prioritize the whole narrative of blackness are we capable of honoring it.

  • Music: https://djrobblog.com/archives/740
  • Comedy (please note some comedians may have offensive aspects of their acts): Richard Pryor, Eddie Murphy, Whoopi Goldberg, the whole Wayans family, Dave Chappelle, Wanda Sykes, Tracy Morgan, Leslie Jones, Nicole Byer, Sasheer Zamata, Travor Noah, Chris Rock, more info on black comedy: https://ndsmcobserver.com/2016/09/history-of-black-comedy/
  • Sitcoms: Martin, Insecure, The Jamie Foxx Show, A Different World, Living Single, Girlfriends, Black-ish, Grown-ish, The Fresh Prince of Bell-Aire, The Game, #BlackAF, The Jeffersons, Sanford & Son, The Proud Family, Everybody Hates Chris, The Bernie Mac Show.
  • Comedic movies: https://www.oprahmag.com/entertainment/tv-movies/g22691091/best-black-movies-netflix/
  • The intention of this portion of the list is not for these items to be perfect, but rather, to prioritize the telling of black stories, black lives– a narrative that is central as opposed to peripheral.

Black Owned Etsy Shops (From MadMommy Blog): https://themadmommy.com/black-owned-etsy-shops/?fbclid=IwAR2hpnKBPwAvd3aXuvaEcylCal7LTASf6VJN8nj9IJA3SuMZJunMQGIlyls

Black & Queer:

Resources in Columbus, OH:

Black Owned Businesses: https://www.columbusnavigator.com/black-owned-businesses-columbus/?fbclid=IwAR3v4CWqks2cvJ-BAPY2zh_MC-Sq2USbJ3oJ4RU9ROoyRzyQCDeISFSCsr4

More Anti-Racist docs:

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